Tuesday, December 10, 2013

A Year in Reading


A Year in Reading

Looking back over the books I have gone through is always an interesting experience, teetering between quite pride and the number of books I have read and despair at the sheer volume of books in my ever expanding to-be-read pile. Anyway, what follows are the highlights (that I have not already reviewed here), not the worst, not the best, but those that stuck in my mind for whatever reason.

 
Rex Libris: I Librarian (Volume 1) By James Turner
Rex Libris: Book of Monsters (Volume 2) By James Turner

Ah, Rex Libris, immortal librarian that brave any foe to the farthest reaches to retrieve overdue books. Only the TV mini-series The Librarian, starring Noah Wyle, comes close to the campy feel that Rex brings. However, the sheer volume of oddball fact and trivia and ridiculousness that Rex and hic companions brings cannot be rivaled.

 

The People of Forever Are Not Afraid by Shani Boianjiu

I picked this up as a book for consideration for a book club figuring that a novel of three young girls in their mandatory military service set in the Middle East would make for some interesting discussion.  However, the book was a slog through muddled apathy. I forced myself to push through to the end, holding out for a redeeming ending only to be disappointed.

 




Sacré Bleu by Christopher Moore

This is my 2013 book that I tell people about and all but throw at them. Well written, well researched, excellent layout, beautiful cover design. If you like art or Christopher Moore, or just odd/dark humor, just read this book.

 

The Emperor’s Soul by Brandon Sanderson

This novella won a Hugo Award and one you finish it, it is easily to understand why. Sanderson creates an amazing world, rich characters, and adds a dash of existential debate, all within 200 pages. He has been getting a good amount of buzz as of late and this might be a good way to ease into his writing, which can be a bit overwhelming in some instances.

 

The Dinner by Herman Koch

One of two books that, when done, I had the urge to chuck across the room (The other being The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake). The idea being of a story slowly unfolding and progressing just as the meal that the characters are eating does is very intriguing. It was touted as revealing a dark side of society and making the reader question how far they would go to protect their family. I more felt that it was a rambling and entirely unreliable narrator justifying criminal activity.

 

Saga (Volume 1 & 2) by Brian K Vaughan

A simply amazing story of a new family risking everything to find their place in a war torn galaxy. With heavy doses of science fiction and fantasy, these graphic novels flawlessly blends love, grit, violence, and of course hope into an award winning series.  I certainly recommend grabbing this one up if it even sounds remotely interesting. You will not regret it.

 

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